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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 300 (some duplicates have been removed)
remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work in ensuring that those very important community members who do so much to ensure that our communities remain strong and vibrant, those who are under served typically continue to be served that our communities are strengthened and our ties are bound and strong. so, in 2012, of this year, we are very lucky enough to have two very distinguished honorees for our distinguished service a word for the city and county of san francisco and the first person we will recognize tonight is vera noon tear if you can please u.s.a. plast she is the social director at the arab culture and community center and she helps hundreds of families in trans by providing social work service and is i know how important that work is and how difficult that work is and i can't thank you enough to ensure that all of our communities are cared
in this community that i using the community. citizen engagement is the key and he want to thank the greatest mayor in the world mayor lee. (clapping) >> not even election time. anyway thank you all for being here. when i first landed in san francisco i i know it's a similar story for you i thought about where i was golden going and i understood its name origin as he city of st. francis. i think that means you come here you've got hopes and you've got hopes for the city that's compassionate. it represents the best of the cities it isn't the rough and tunnel city that i've had experience in but it had the special sense of freedom and compassion and quality and quality and all those things are happening with a banner year of getting rid of proposition 8 and celebrating life (clapping) where we're a pretty special place. it's even more special to create new jobs for people. we've never forgotten where we've came from the city of st. francis has never gotten and that's distinguished us. project hope has been about our expression now conditionally 50 times. our compassion and our opportunity for everyo
we've came from the city of st. francis has never gotten and that's distinguished us. project hope has been about our expression now conditionally 50 times. our compassion and our opportunity for everyone who lives and works here to demonstrate that compassion. to each other. to that make this city a safer city and a more successful city but for the city for the 1 hundred percent. i want to a thank las vegas e devon and the whole staff for being here and the public health department. i want to thank our sf thank you and today sports 6 hundred members of our technology companies that point to experience not only the use of technology but also express their compassion for the city in giving back to a city that's helped them be successful. today, we have four very special sponsors and thank you for keeping your rates down. sprint for keeping us communicated prima facia. and virgin mobile and assurance wireless. their not only sponsors here but have brought anti volunteers and every time we get those opportunities you know what it's like first year perhaps for the first time looking so
, they are going to find value with it and use it and be productive with it every day. and half of the city's population that's in the other boat is disconnected from all that potential prosperity. >> we really need to promote content and provide applications that are really relevant to people's lives here. so a lot of the inspiration, especially among the immigrant community, we see is communications with people from their home country but we as much want to use the internet as a tool for people to connect within the local san francisco community. >> i think it's our job as public educators to give them this access and give them this opportunity to see that their efforts are being appreciated beyond their immediate reach. >> you have to blend this idea of community network with computer equipment with training and with support. we can pull all that together, then we've got it. >> it's as much about social and economic justice -- in fact it's more about social and economic justice than just bec to do make change in this community that i using the community. citizen engagement is the key an
technology companies that point to experience not only the use of technology but also express their compassion for the city in giving back to a city that's helped them be successful. today, we have four very special sponsors and thank you for keeping your rates down. sprint for keeping us communicated prima facia. and virgin mobile and assurance wireless. their not only sponsors here but have brought anti volunteers and every time we get those opportunities you know what it's like first year perhaps for the first time looking somebody in the eye and saying i care about where you're going and i don't want you to necessarily live the rough-and-tumble street life. get some she felt and food and take a moment and think about what's happening next week. we care about your background. we know there may not be other supporters in your life. we care about you a because we know about life and want to share >> compassion in san francisco. this is what project homeless is all about and hopefully with that opportunity something might occur where someone says i want to do something for my
and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce
likewise us to have that conversations and it's with you the volunteers we get this special opportunity to do that. i want to say from the bottom of my heart and as the representative for all san francisco thank you, thank you, thank you for all you're great work, bring forgot the love of this city and make sure we continue with generations of other people we've got to continue being helpful and this is what san francisco is all about. thank you for being great san franciscans (clapping) >> as we think of our 50th event we think about what the mayor said this is a city of compassion. there have been 23 though volunteers that help the needs of the homeless in this city. 3 thousand. if you do the math that's 1 out of every san franciscan has been involved and have been involved with the homeless in our community. that is something that no other city can boost and that comes from the top down. when we think about what our city has to over one of the you biggest things we have is people who are ill maybe they're on the street from diabetes. last week, i saw a man who said i've worked for 2
when they call. we address the calls accordingly. we tend to use the numbers favorably. >> back to what this chief said, i certainly understand the fact that staffing drives a lot of this and i think it would be useful for us given where we are in terms of staffing to have a conversation of what would it take in terms of resources to get to the right amount of staffing prior to 18 if that's where we are now and talking about making changes that could expand hours i'm sure this community could be very interested in working with the police department to get to that point, 2018 is a long time. but i think that to expedited the right result with staffing, there are things we can do right now. we are undermining our own efforts to grow the economy and hopefully we don't have to wait to have those conversations. >> okay. berry, did you want to say something? >> supervisor really hit on it fairly quickly as well. that is i was just going to ask chief sur if there is anything that our industry can do to expedited the staffing and the resources that might be needed to help in light of the econom
level. those phone calls are not used to be treated with respect and the fact you're doing that can be life changing p i'm proud to be part of this event. i want to thank you you're making san francisco the city of hope for so many people. so thank you >> thank you supervisor campos. you know, i've been taught your blessed whether argue blessing. today, we're blessed when we see people giving up their day so thank you to you guys. let's give ourselves a round of applause for coming out today. i have have list of people i want to thank but one of the first, we have the ceo and forgive me if i'm saying your name wrong. thank you so much for participating today they'll helped us expand our mental and dental team so people can get the best services as they move into permanent housing so thank you. i want to thank alex. he's been obviously from the beginning that. one of the founders. anytime i need something i say we need a little bit of extra money for socks. all the things you do thank you sf city for snanlt helping. one of the things it sf city is it doing for us is anything who joi
in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is wherl of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that allow us to deal with the sometimes imperfections in city government. to figure it out, where it is we need to take risks, we are we can be more entrepreneurial, where we can be more transparent and frank little more accountable to all of you as the residents and as our customers here in city government. and this is why i am proud tomorrow to help move forward legislation that my staff has been working closely with jay nath and mayor leon that will real i do three things. first of all, it will create a chief data officer because we need one person who is responsible and accountable for moving forward our open data agenda. secondly, we're going to require every department in the city to have a representative who is respon
master comes in at te time that it is changing. we also have clock watchers across the street who tell us if it is off by a second, so he is very attached to the clock. >> we have a clock master. and look at this, the hands of the clock. look how big they are. the holy mackerel. nobody is up here. but this. it the great seal of the state of california. this is a wonderful mosaic. >> it is wonderful. it was original to the building. tens of thousands of people cross by every day. this is the waiting area. the larger alcoves or for storage. and the big plants that would go out to meet the ferries. people would come out to meet the ferries. and then go to the trolley cars. the family of the original artisan still lives in the bay area and they come by every so often to make sure that it is in tact and being taken care of. furry little repair to it. this is the before and after, 1910 to 1960's, 1970's. this is what the building looked like during that time. it was under plywood and carpeting for about 30 years. this was amazingly preserved underneath all of that when it pulled up. >> how to t
to be used in the first place. but i appreciate the fact that the warriors are focusing on private fund-raising and i prefer that they stick to that. i don't think the city should be -- with the situation we're in now, we should be really investing in that and the warriors seem to be committed to privately fund-raising for it and i'm happy that they're stepping up to do that. >> exciting change. >> yes. >> we're almost out of time. but are there any other issues that concern you that we haven't discussed or anything that you plan to concentrate on as your term of supervisor? >> i think one of the things that i really want to concentrate on is making sure that we are collaborating more. because as a city, we're growing. resources are being stretched. and it's going to be important that organizations collaborate. city departments collaborate. that we don't just operate in our own little departments, our own little sections of the city, but how do we come together to make sure that, for example, upper haight with a lot of great businesses, lot of great opportunities for internships for you
center where she lives, she said the most commonly used assisted technology is a two-inch-long piece of black ls will take, used to cover the flashing light on the vcr and the dvd player -- black electrical tape. she says it is easier the learning to program the clock. for the most part, a lot of seniors to not trust technology. people have gotten the word that there are risks to using technology, and a lot of seniors want to stay away from it. as much as i want to get my mother to do online banking and paying her bills, never going to happen. she is never going to do that. at the center for accessible technology, we work to understand the mindset of our clients, and as a result, we have systems in place of how we work with them. one of the things we do is we asked people -- what do you want to use a computer for? i cannot tell you how many people tell us they have never been asked that. they have been told they need to use a computer, but no one has told the what they need it for. sometimes we hear that people do not have anything they want to use it for, but a lot of times, they ha
? they ended up -- i said, do not paint over it. it's got to be power washed. you have to use -- that can be really expensive. they went and painted over it. and now it looks worse than the graffiti. i see it all over the city that a tag is painted over with brown paint, with whatever is available. and then it becomes a real problem because it's really hard to remove it then. so, i think that -- my thought about it, i know dpw doesn't have the financial resources, but realistically i think sidewalks even though they're kind of that nebulous gray area where technically they're owned by the property owner, but they really are public property. and i think that's something that dpw should somehow find the funding to take care of that property because private property owners are not going to hire somebody with a power washer to come out there and do it. i just know it. i mean, i see very, very few examples of that. >> larry. >> i would agree. but as always, it's an issue of funding. we do have approved product listses on our website. so, if you run into somebody, there are some there they can
with 4:00 in the morning but they have 40,000 police officers in the city. it's a resource issue for us at least for right now having a conversation because the daytime people where the most people have been dying for beat officers, officers on foot, officers on bicycles, school resource officers . if the hours were stretched, it would stress our resources that much later into night to cover those extra hours making this a 24 hour time like new york is. right now it's not a conversation that we are in a position to have. >> so i understand there is going to be some policing training. >> we have plans to be full staffing by 2018. >> you have a question? >> it's more of just a comment going along with the 4 a.m. legislature. i know you said you are short on resources, it's also something to consider the standpoint of club employees. i work the bar staff and ride a bicycle. if a show goes really late and the bars let out at 130 and all these massive people and it's an issue of safety for employees also along with patrons. i know you mentioned your club gets out at 4:00. we are next to you
and mitch the senate republican lear mitch mcconnell. it was held at u.s. capitol. here's a portion of the event that runs just under an hour. we are back live at 11:00 eastern time with the ceremony on the mall on the steps of the lincoln memorial. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable nancy pelosi. >> good afternoon. thank you for bringing us together for this congressional bipartisan observance of the 50 year anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to ac
important element of style. line can be used in so very many different ways. it can be obvious. it can be actual. in other words, as in this drawing, watercolor, we can see actual lines. they vary. you have thin lines. you have very thick lines. for example, the figures here have very agitated and excited lines. these are very straight lines. but they create the illusion and suggest volume. they suggest shape and form. line can also be implied, and that takes practice. it takes a considerable amount of work in order to be able to discern the implied lines because they're not actually drawn on the painting. they're not included there, and they're not easily discernible. the implied line, for example here, suggests the arrangement of the buildings in such a way that the artist is indicating depth. so we are addressing implied lines suggest perspective, the system of linear perspective and the way in which all the parallel lines appear to be converging towards a centric point in this work. when we look and continue with implied line, let's look at vermeer's painting of a girl seated behin
hello, welcome to the news hour. these are the top stories. the u.s. is weighing its option for military option after a new video suggests a chemical weapons attack has taken place. >> in the northern city of triply, the syrian battle drowned has now moved to lebanon. >> more evidence against boxilai. the one powerful politician, accused of embezzling more than $1 million. the u.s. soldier who shot dead 16 after danes is sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole, and. >> meet the baghdad zoo keepers trying to get these cub as fighting chance. >> u.s. president security advisors will be meeting at the white house this morning to discuss how to deal with syria. president obama is looking at military options among other things. meanwhile the u.n. top disamberment has arrived in syria. near damascus on wednesday. carl stratford has the latest pictures of that attack, and you may find this report upsetting. n. crying [. >> the two tiny bodies hang limp in his arms. >> what will i do now, cries the father? a man destroyed by grief. pictures like these of the 34
and have been locating here in san francisco to help us create the new workforce. because if we don't can certainly create that workforce it'll be created by somebody else for other people. so we formed a training row graham in 19 san francisco residents of diverse backgrounds to the jobs in the tech sector called tech sf. they've already began to enroll their graduates into the very technology company that are successfully locating here in the city. as i said earlier, were making progress in our public school system. test scores are at an all-time high in truancy is down in our school district, where one of the highest performance entities in the state broadly satisfied with that because we know ours middle schools are not good enough. were going to get the good were going to get to parental engagement in our middle schools. that's where the downfall that the two lindsay is at. we will help them to exceed. we will deliver even more resources and tax. in fact, this year the city of san francisco will help with over $100 million of resources to our san francisco school district. were not g
for neurotoxic symptoms. 300 and 55 of them we're told have died. syria faces allegations that it used chemical weapons in an attack on wednesday. syrian state television say soldiers have found nerve agents in tunnels used by rebels. the new head of the syrian national coalition called for an urgent look into syria. >> we need to put an end to the killing of the syrian people and forcing the syrians to flee their country. an international investigation is quite pontiac, and to discuss the situation with the seventh chapter of the united nations despite hijacking the council by russia, china, and some other countries. they are not really in support of the syrian cause. >> obama has been meeting with his national security advisers to discuss the options on syria. we have the latest pictures of wednesday's chemical attack. we'll warn you you may find the following images disturbing. [ sobbing ] >> reporter: the two tiny bodies hang limp in his arms. "what will i do now?" cries the father. the man destroyed by grief. picture like these with many men, women, and children indiscriminately killed by
in the south. from texas up to maryland, we can use the public toilet. my high school class couldn't take picture on the capitol lawn of south carolina. we were away then from the american promise. >> reporter: it might have been given those circumstances, it might have been understandable if martin luther king preached retribution. but he did not do that. some members of the civil rights movement then criticized him for it. malcolm x refused to come to the march on washington. he called it the farce on washington. king, as we all know now was all about nonviolence. listen up. >> one of the things that my father was really trying to say not just 50 years ago but 50 years ago, 49, 48, 47, all the way, 45 when he was as isnated, he was really speaking to us about our humanity. and understanding our interconnectedness and interrelatedness. that is why he talked about sitting down at the table of brotherhood. in other words, us understanding that we are one huge human family. yes, there are a lot of different races but we are a human family. that is why he talked about not judging by the colo
>> hello a chilling assessment of weapons used in syria from doctors without borders. >> the white house says president obama has gotten a range of potential options from his national security team on how to respond to the use of chemical weapons in syria. >> a fast-moving wildfire threatens yosemite park and has the city of san francisco under a state of emergency. thousands march for civil rights and racial equality, where we stand 50 years after martin luther king, jr.'s iva dream spee >> good to have you with us. there may be more evidence of what appears to be a chemical weapons attack last week in damaskas. three hospitals supported by the international humanitarian group say victims started pouring in wednesday exhibiting neuro toxic symptoms. medical staff say they treated 3600 patients in a time span of just three hours of those patients, medics say 355 people died. wednesday night's attack has prompted president obama to discuss potential military options in syria. the new president of the syrian national coalition has called for an international military intervention in
. >> okay. alan valdez thanks for joining us. that's a look at the first hour. let's get to a full second hour as we make sense of this day and look ahead to the next couple of days on the second hour of the "closing bell". >>> it is the 4:00 hour on wall street. we welcome to you the second hour of the closing bill i'm bill griffeth along with michelle caruso-cabrera who is in for maria bartiromo. stocks snap that two day losing streak despite concerns about syria. >> the dow jones industrial average higher by 50 points. >> dow on course for its worst month in over a year bob pisani. any more? >> we were down 3% on the s&p 500. let's put up the dow jones industrial average. not today. not because we had any positive news we just didn't have much news. we didn't have a lot of headlines around syria. let's call it a relief rally. put up the full screen. did droop a little bit. lack of headlines for syria is what was lifting the stock market today overall. we've seen a gap between secretary of state's announcement a couple of days ago and actually action and today that worked to everybody'
. it has been a pleasure to be here. >> why don't we start by asking you to give us a general background as your beautiful country? a lot of people in taiwan know very little about brazil, even though brazil is a very important country in the international community. can you tell us a little bit about your beautiful country? for example, land size, population. are some of the tourist destinations? >> brazil is large and diverse. brazil has about 8.5 million square kilometers. almost 200 million people. populated by europeans, africans, asians. you can imagine how we have different cultures, different geography. what we have most information from outside -- it is one region of brazil. when you go to brazil -- >> very diverse. >> you have a near continent- sized country. the first thing you notice in brazil -- a brand-new future was developed in the culture, with a mix of european, african, and local aborigines, and asians. we have such a different mix. we have a very open society. nobody is an outsider. nobody is a foreigner. nobody can say who is a brazilian, who is not a brazilian. we a
airport is using a heard of goats, sheep, lama to trim the grass. >> all that -- >> dr. king spoke. i said wake up wake up america. >> and he said i have a dream. so weren't you fighting each other? >> and all that matters. >> emotional testimony from halle berry and jennifer garner on aggressive paparazzi. >> i don't want a gang to continue traumatizing my kids. >> on "cbs this morning." >> this teenager making a big entrance at his bar mitzvah. ♪ ♪ i love to dance ♪ >>> welcome to cbs this morning. good morning norah. >> good morning. we've got some breaking news. >> as you wake up in the west we're learning more about the crash of a u.p.s. cargo jet this morning in birmingham alabama. >> birmingham's mayor says just two people were killed the pilot and co-pilot of that air bus. rick jackson of our birmingham affiliate is at the scene. rick, good morning. >> reporter: yes we're about half a mile away from the actual accident scene here. the reason why is because officials early on block the entire perimeter off because of the explosions going off. that ha
. in the next hearing they say we don't like the way you are dealing with 6103. give us everything as fast as you can. 17 lawyers working full time going through documents -- let me tell you something. on the one hand, if you release information about taxpayers, they would be all over you. i'm just saying. you are damned if you do and damned if you don't. the best thing to do is to obey the law, period. mr. mckinney coming to have recommendations mr. werfel talked about losing 8,000 employees, sequestration. how does that affect your recommendations? >> as it relates to identity that? >> yes. [laughter] >> well, obviously they have to draw when they have a problem they have to draw from the existing employee base that affect the other operation. that is the concern and will be a concern of ours also. >> okay. let's see, you have two and a half minutes. >> they did release the information. the inspector general said so for different times and one of them was referred to the justice department for prosecution. the justice department won't prosecute. so they did exactly what -- i want all the
anywhere near the television or anywhere online today you have heard a lot about syria. potential u.s. intervention in the conflict after the alleged chemical attacks, wall street is watching. development of the middle east very closely. affecting everything from oil prices to airline stocks are of course the of gold. we are down 145 points, very near session lows for the day. here are your commodities, jumping up close to 2% per ounce right now, $23 backing off a little bit. oil the big story here, it is a gain of almost 3%. we are pushing $109 per barrel. we are doing that right now again. much more what has been happening to commodities later on in the show. we are also watching this stock for you, jcpenney showing signs of life at the retail chain and activist saw them several ties after selling 20 million shares. he lost almost $500 million, but he is out again with the stock. now the stock is actually down. down more than 1%. you can see the volatility on the screen for jcpenney. now for the very latest developments on that crisis in syria what the united states might be plannin
? gorgeous on her first day, tweet us at my fox dc. dozens of homes evacuated after a gas leak in the neighborhood. workers were digging near summerhill and northham roads. firefighters went door to door telling everyone to get out. >> as soon as i opened the door, gas filled through the house. we had a baby over here, miss bee's child care across the street. >> about 80 homes affected. washington gassies the leak. >> coming up, a warning if you are headed to the skins game, find out why certain bags are no longer allowed. >> a new twist in nsa investigation, find out why a man has the white house answering questions. >> massive wild fire out west tackling the blaze the size of denver, gary? >> big fire. we have clouds, no real showers if you are headed to the game, weather wise no issues. here is what it looks like out there now. it is going to start feeling more like august. we have a first look at your forecast all coming up, stay with us.  >> the unrest continues in egypt nearly a week after a government crack down after oust of president morsi. two
and kissed me. >> 67-year-old peggy shannon. she works as a senior center and uses a cane. >> i am a mother, a grandmother and a great-grandmother. >> she's accuser number 16. >> bob filner needs to resign now. >>> also -- day of rage. egypt on edge and america closely watching. the conflict getting critical as both sides now criticizing the united states. >>> plus, a major nationwide dog and cat food recall. big brands you probably use. >>> and it's true, it's there. it's real. beware of the little men, they might really be watching. you're live in the "cnn newsroom." ♪ >>> good morning to you, thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello and we begin with our first look at hannah anderson since the fbi helped rescue her. also disturbing new evidence found at the home of the man accused of kidnapping her and killing her mother and brother. that evidence includes condoms, boxes for handcuffs and letters from hannah. cnn's casey wian is live in san diego this morning with more. good morning, casey. >> good morning, carol. you know, at that first public appearance by hannah ander
, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually talking about it beca
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 300 (some duplicates have been removed)

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